Leave It Out: Developing anti-homophobic bullying practice in schools

AUTHOR: The Rainbow Project Youthnet's shOut Project and Save the Children

PUBLISHER: Save the Children

YEAR: 2008

PAGES: 68

SUMMARY:

A resource to help change attitudes and behaviours within the school community.

KEYWORDS:

activities, anti-bullying, bullying, fact sheets, lesson plans, practice, rainbow project, save the children, shout project, stimulus, teachers, worksheets, youth, youthnet

TARGET AUDIENCE:

transition year, 16+ years, senior primary, junior cycle, 12-15 years, whole school

AVAILABLE FORMATS:

book, guidelines, policy document

TAGS:

Available from:

Download Leave it Out PDF


DESCRIPTION

Leave it out proposes that real and positive change can be achieved by facing up to the problem of homophobic bullying.

The resource recommends revising school policies to specifically identify the issue of homophobic bullying within the school’s anti-bullying policy. By doing this, schools will experience a reduction in the use of homophobic language and bullying behaviour and create a safer environment for all young people.

Leave It Out builds on existing ‘universal’ bullying support resources, like Save the Children’s ‘Focus on Bullying’. It encourages Boards of Governors, principals, teachers, support staff and pupils to take collective responsibility for much needed changes in attitudes and behaviours within the school community.

This resource is set out in three sections, and includes a range of supporting materials based on the experience of the PRIDE pilot:

 

Section 1 is aimed at school managers and provides guidance and information on the policy context, practical information on how to respond to the challenge of homophobic bullying, and activities which can be used to introduce an ethos of anti-homophobic bullying practice to teaching and non-teaching school staff.

 

Section 2 offers specific information and guidance on developing a strategic response to homophobic bullying which is shared and understood by all staff. This section also provides specific information on establishing an ‘advocate’ within the school. The advocate is a member of staff who will lead the approach with young people, acting as a catalyst for change within the school and with the range of stakeholders involved in the life of the school.

 

Section 3 offers activities to support teachers’ and pupils’ discussion of the issue of homophobic bullying, recognising that young people play an important role in sustaining attitudinal change. These resources are designed to be used as part of the revised curriculum and to fit current practice within the curriculum